Monthly Archives: January 2017

Candied Orange Sticks

Because we don’t like too much peel in our marmalade, I had a lot of orange peel left over! Not wanting to waste any of it, this is what we ended up with…

Chocolate Dipped Candied Orange Sticks

These little morsels of orange deliciousness can be made from the unused peel of oranges that you have juiced!

Sugar coated candied orange sticks -1

Sugar-Coated Candied Orange Sticks

Candied Orange Sticks

  • Servings: Makes a small jar full - if they last long enough for you to put them in the jar, that is
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I had a lot of peel left from making orange marmalade, not wanting to waste it, I had a thought that it could be made into candied chocolate orange sticks. When finished, I was told that I hadn't made nearly enough!!

Ingredients

  • 4 oranges
  • Sugar
  • Caster Sugar
  • 50 g good quality, 70% cocoa dark chocolate

Directions

  1. Wash the oranges.
  2. Score the peel of the oranges into quarters with a sharp knife. Put all of the oranges in large basin and cover them with boiling water. Allow to stand for 5 minutes, then drain and peel away the skins. Using this method, both the outer peel and the inner white pith will come away from the fruit.
  3. Put the peel into a saucepan and cover with water.
  4. Bring to the boil and then reduce to a simmer and cook for an hour.
  5. Drain the peel and gently scrape out the soft pulp from inside the peel.
  6. Slice the peel into strips .5cm/1/4 inch wide.
  7. Weigh the peel, and then the same weight of sugar.
  8. Put the peel and the sugar into a small pan – the peel and sugar need to be quite snug in the pan.
  9. Add just enough water to cover the peel and then bring to the boil. Immediately reduce the heat to a very gentle simmer and cook until the peel is translucent and has absorbed almost all of the syrup.
  10. Remove the peel from the pan and spread it on a tray lined with baking paper. (If the peel tends to curl, carefully straighten them, place another sheet of baking paper on top and weight down with another tray overnight.)
  11. Leave at room temperature for at least 24 hours to dry out.
  12. Place a little caster sugar into a dish and then, adding a few strips of peel at a time, throughly coat each piece with the caster sugar.
  13. Alternatively, melt the dark chocolate in the microwave or in a double boiler, and coat half of each orange stick with the chocolate and then lay on a tray lined with a new piece of baking paper. Place in the fridge to set.

Notes:

  • Adapted from a recipe in The Preserving Book, (2010)  L Brown, p156
  • Try using other citrus, lemons, limes, grapefruit…

Until next time…

Bon appétit!

Source: Candied Orange Sticks

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Orange & Mint Jelly

This lovely jelly will be used in lamb and duck dishes.

Source: Orange & Mint Jelly

Orange and Mint Jelly

  • Servings: Makes 1.5 litre (approx)
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This recipe has been adapted from a similar recipe for Orange and Rosemary Jelly from 'Good Old-Fashioned Jams, Preserves and Chutneys' by Sara Paston (a gift from colleagues when I left my last job). I am imagining that it will go very nicely with lamb and duck and will be used to make gravies and sauces for same.

Ingredients

  • 2 kg oranges
  • 500 g lemons
  • 3 litres water
  • 1 bunch (about 20 sprigs) of mint, washed
  • 2 kg (approx) white sugar

Directions

  1. Wash, halve and slice the oranges and lemons.
  2. Place the fruit into a large pan with the water and half of the mint, roughly chopped.
  3. Bring to the boil and simmer gently for approximately 1 hour, until the fruit is soft.
  4. Strain through a jelly bag and then measure the juice and add to a clean pan.
  5. Add 450g of sugar, for each 600ml of liquid, to the pan.
  6. Heat gently, stirring until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil and boil rapidly until setting point is reached.
  7. Meanwhile remove the leaves from the remaining mint and finely chop – you should have about one cup of finely chopped mint.
  8. Skim any scum from the top of the mixture and allow to stand for 10 minutes.
  9. Carefully stir in the mint.
  10. Pour into hot, sterilized jars and seal with lids.
  11. Turn the jars upside down and every so often turn them the right way up. Repeat until the jelly is almost set, giving a little shake at the same time. This is to ensure the mint is evenly distributed through the set jelly rather than rising to form a thick layer on the top!

Notes:

  • The whole fruit, including the peel, is used in the initial process.
  • Getting herbs etc evenly suspended in jellies takes a little time and patience, but the end result is always worth it.
  • Use to accompany meats such as lamb, pork, chicken and duck. Also use in gravies and sauces, or to liven up the flavour of a casserole.

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Oranges 1

My beautiful sister Jan, recently visited us for a little holiday. Jan lives in the north of the state of Victoria, very close to the great Murray River, and a wonderful citrus fruit growing area – about six and a half hours drive from here! When I knew that she and her friend, Heather, were going to come for a visit, I asked if she could pick up a couple of bags of oranges, thinking that they would be the same size as those you can pick up at fruit and vegie shops – 3 kilograms… When she arrived, I was presented with 2 bags of oranges – each weighing about 10 kilograms! 20 kilograms of oranges for $12 – that is crazy!!! Of course, I was not allowed to pay for them, but now the challenge begins…

I have given some to visitors, and we have eaten quite a few, and I think I have had to throw about 6 out! I have made old fashioned butter cake – gluten free, which after a couple of tries, is pretty darned good. The orange cake has been iced, sliced and frozen, so that we can have cake when we feel like it.

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However, over the next week there will be a lot of orange based recipes being prepared, and at times, concocted in my kitchen. On the list so far:

  • Orange marmalade – a must for Gary;
  • Orange and mint jelly – already half made;
  • A delicious refreshing citrus mocktail – which could easily be turned into a cocktail for those who must;
  • Orange cordial;
  • Sauces;
  • Salads;
  • Desserts, etc!

Oh, and a little tip, for an easy way to peal oranges, that I read about in an old recipe book of mine The Times Calendar CookBook by Katie Stewart, 1975. This works beautifully, but would probably only do 4-6 oranges at a time, because they still need to be hot for the peel and pith to come away cleanly.

To peel oranges:

Score the peel of the oranges into quarters with a sharp knife. Put all of the oranges in large basin and cover them with boiling water. Allow to stand for 5 minutes, then drain and peel away the skins. Using this method, both the outer peel and the inner white pith will come away from the fruit. If any white pith remains, simply scrape it away with a knife.

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I have also tried this method on lemons and it worked just as well, so would imagine it could be used on most citrus – grapefruits, limes etc.

I hope that you enjoy seeing everything orange from my kitchen over the next week!

Until next time…

Bon appétit!

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